#OurUNM Greeted by the Police at their Candlelight Vigil

#OurUNM Banner

Police officers lined the streets and news cameras were ready to roll as #OurUNM approached President Frank’s house on Tuesday. The student movement had slowly made its way across campus, linking arms in a show of solidarity. As they crossed the street to set up a candlelight vigil in the President’s front yard, the police officers snapped to attention and prohibited the group from leaving the sidewalk. The officers did not care that the land was located on public property or that the student’s tuition paid for the luxurious home of the mighty President Frank. They were there to protect the Privileged and to persecute the People.

Police power

Police officers stand guard to keep these radicals off the lawn

The Movement was peaceful and the students did not have any intention of harming the President or the taxpayer property on which his tuition paid home was located. They were there to hold a candlelight vigil in remembrance of every student, faculty member, or community member that the system has tragically failed. They were there to tell personal stories that illustrated the point of the Movement. They gathered in front of President Frank’s house to make a statement and to encourage him to engage with the students.

Apparently President Frank had other ideas. His personal security force, also known as the UNM Police Department, formed a perimeter of safety around his fortress. He wasn’t going to stoop down to the level of these radical leftist students who do not represent his “real” student body. He had more important matters to attend to that evening. He had dinner guests to entertain and he couldn’t ignore that obligation. At the end of the evening, he made sure to ignore the mob on the sidewalk while he walked his distinguished guests to their car.

President Frank

President Frank and his guests (apparently more important than the students on his sidewalk)

The police officers must have been ordered to allow the Privileged onto the property. During the vigil, multiple students cut across the President’s front lawn without a peep from the police officers. They were not about to stop “real” students from exerting their privilege. They were there to keep the criminals and radicals on the sidewalk.

Channel 7 News seemed to have more important issues to cover and left. They weren’t going to waste time actually listening to what the students had to say. They wanted action and violence. That was newsworthy, while a peaceful and respectful gathering of students was just plain boring. Mainstream media does not have time to care about real issues; they need excitement to keep their advertisers happy.

On the other hand, Univision stayed for the entire vigil. The reporter was involved and really interested in the student’s stories. Univision really cared about the issues and the people involved.

Despite the obvious systematic discrimination taking place, the evening was a success. #OurUNM continued to show that they stand for peace, respect, inclusion, and equity. Students were drawn to the vigil and shared some very emotional stories with the group. Community members joined in and expressed solidarity with the Movement. Children played and made sure that all of the candles remained lit. Poets spoke beautiful and powerful words to inspire the group. It was an amazing moment in time and is a sign that something special is happening.

OurUNM Alter

President Frank may think very little of the Movement and mainstream media may not care, but a small group of students and community members are determined to change UNM. One of the students put it best by quoting Margaret Mead:

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

Enough said. Please join the Movement and change the world! https://www.facebook.com/ourunm

 

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